Videos

How to Use an APPENDIX IWB holster (AIWB)

Posted by on May 12, 2012 in Blog, Videos | 1 comment


In this video, I talk about how to wear and use an inside-the-waistband appendix holster (or IWB). I also discuss how to draw and shoot from this style of holster.

First we need to understand exactly what an inside-the-waistband appendix holster is. It is called an inside the waistband (or IWB) holster, because it’s carried between your pants and your body so the gun is “inside the waistband”.

The appendix IWB holster is typically worn between 10 o’clock and 2 o’clock, which is what makes it an appendix carry.

If you picture a clock around your body with 12 o’clock at your navel, you can picture where these positions are. 9 o’clock is on the left side and 3 o’clock is on the right side. Appendix carry can be worn anywhere in between.

The exact position where you’ll wear the holster will depend upon your individual body type and preferences. So just play around with it and see what you prefer.

I explain this for a right-handed person, but a lefty will be exactly the same. Just use the opposite hands.

The appendix holster is typically worn on the strong side of the body, which is the right side for most people. At this position, it normally positioned as a neutral cant, meaning that the holster is straight up and down and the pistol will be withdrawn straight up.

When we move the holster over to the left side, this is typically called a crossdraw. Most people probably think of a crossdraw as having a reverse cant (which means the gun is tilted back toward the right side. This is great for an outside the waistband holster (or OWB), but it doesn’t really work that well for an IWB. What happens is that the grip of the pistol gets rotated down too close to the belt making it hard to get a good grip on it. Another problem is that the muzzle rotates UP toward the belt and this puts too much of the handgun’s weight above the belt, which isn’t very secure.
So if you want to carry cross-draw with an IWB, we believe that it is best to use a neutral cant.

Whether or not your shirt is tucked in won’t make much of a difference with this technique, but you SHOULD practice the same way that you normally carry.

With your left hand, reach down and grab a big firm handful of your shirt and really yank it loose and high out of the way. It won’t matter much if your shirt is tucked in or not. Pull hard and fast. You want to make sure that your shirt is completely out of the way before you reach for your gun.

Now that your shirt is out of the way, find the gun. At this point, your hand should be directly above the pistol. Get a good, firm grip. Leave trigger finger off of the trigger. You need to have your firing grip before leaving the holster.

Pull pistol straight up.
Twist your pistol forward. You can actually fire from this position if you need to.

Now let go of your shirt with your left hand. Bring it back over and meet your right hand, then bring the pistol forward.

Fully extend your arms into a shooting position. You can actually start firing your pistol while it’s in close and keep firing your weapon all the way through this maneuver’.

Make sure to practice this over and over until you can do it without even thinking about it. In a real life situation, you don’t want to have to think your way through this. You want to be able to react.

One final note, with this style of holster, the gun will take up some of the room in your pants. If you wear really tight pants, this option may not be right for you. Some people choose to buy some pants that are one size larger than what they normally wear, but most find this unnecessary. If you want to know if an IWB holster is right for you before you spend your money on one, a good test is to unload your gun and stick it in your waistband. If it fits easily, you should be OK. If your pants are too tight to fit the gun, you probably need to buy some bigger pants first or consider an outside the waistband holster (or OWB).

Also, be sure to checkout Old Faithful Holsters for a great selection of IWB Holsters & OWB Holsters.

How to Use a concealed carry IWB Hip Holster

Posted by on May 10, 2012 in Blog, Videos | 1 comment

In this video, I talk to you about how to wear and use a concealed carry inside the waistband hip holster. I also discuss how to draw and shoot from this style of holster.

I’d like to start off by thanking Mr. Massad Ayoob who was generous enough to share some of his knowledge on the subject with me. You can learn a lot at his website at http://massadayoobgroup.com/

Now, I’d like to point out that my pistol is unloaded. There is no magazine and the chamber is empty. When you practice, you should take the same precautions. Also, no one is behind the camera.

First we need to understand exactly what a concealed carry inside the waistband hip holster is. It is called an inside the waistband (or IWB) holster, because it stows between your pants and your body so the gun is “inside the waistband”.

One thing to note right off the bat is that the width of the gun will take up some of the room in your pants. If you wear really tight pants, this option may not be right for you. Many people choose to buy some pants that are one size larger than what they normally wear, but most find this unnecessary. If you want to know if an IWB holster is right for you before you spend your money on one, a good test is to unload your gun and stick it in your waistband. If it fits easily, you should be good to go. If your pants are too tight to fit the gun, you probably need to buy some bigger pants first or consider an outside the waistband holster (or OWB).

This holster is typically worn between 3 and 5 o’clock.

If you picture a clock around your body with 12 o’clock at your navel, you can picture where these positions are. 3 o’clock is on the side and 5 o’clock is just about directly over the back pocket.

The exact position where you’ll wear the holster will depend upon your individual body type and preferences. So just play around with it and see what you prefer.

Whether or not your shirt is tucked in won’t make much of a difference with this technique, but you SHOULD practice the same way that you normally carry.

I’m going to explain this for a right-handed person, and a lefty will be exactly the same. Just use the opposite arms.

1. The first thing you need to do when drawing your weapon is to find it. It sounds like common sense, but you really do need to practice finding your gun and getting a good firm grip on it. When you’re in a crisis situation, you’ll have to rely on muscle memory and instinct rather than high level thought processes.

Start off by bringing both of your hands back simultaneously to where your holster is. The right hand needs to come straight back. Massad Ayoob tells me that the biggest mistake he sees is the elbow way out here like a chicken wing. Make sure to keep your elbow in.

Now with your left hand, reach far around as close as you can get to your holster. Grab a big firm handful of your shirt and really yank it loose and out of the way. It won’t matter much if your shirt is tucked in or not. Pull hard and fast. You want to make sure that your shirt is completely out of the way before you reach for your gun.

2. At this point, your hand should be directly above the pistol. Get a good, firm grip. Leave trigger finger off of the trigger. You need to have your firing grip before leaving the holster.

3. Pull pistol straight up. Your holster may be angled forward, but when you pull straight up, the gun will come forward some. You probably can’t actually lift the gun straight up from the 5 o’clock position, but picture in your head bringing the gun straight up as you draw your weapon.

4. Twist your pistol forward while still at the hip. You can actually fire from this position if you need to. It’s best to angle the top of the pistol away from you at about a 30-45 degree angle to make sure the slide doesn’t hit you when it cycles and to keep the empty brass away from your face.

4. Now let go of your shirt with your left hand. Bring it back over and meet your right hand, then bring the pistol forward.

6. Fully extend your arms into a shooting position. You may have figured this out already, but you can actually start firing from the hip and keep firing your weapon all the way through this maneuver’.

Make sure to practice this over and over until you can do it without even thinking about it. When you are swimming in adrenaline, you don’t want to have to think your way through a this. You want to be able to react.

If you liked this, please subscribe.

Old Faithful Holsters Design Explained

Posted by on May 8, 2012 in Blog, Videos | 0 comments

 

If you’ve tried lot’s of other holsters and think it’s impossible to comfortably conceal a pistol you’ll be amazed at how well our holsters perform. Every holster we make was designed first and foremost to be highly concealable.

The element of surprise is very important in a self defense situation and a holster that gives you away is lowering your odds of survival. Our inside-the-waistband (IWB) holsters are designed to be completely tuckable. The only visible parts are the discreet clips that attach the holster to your belt. Concealability is very important, but it is not the only trait of a good holster.

We also firmly believe that a holster has to be comfortable, because if your holster isn’t comfortable the odds increase that you will leave home without it. I’ve heard the old saying that “A gun shouldn’t be comfortable, it should be comforting”. I couldn’t disagree more; it should be both. If you can’t comfortably carry your gun all day, you’ll find times when you just leave it a home. Criminals don’t wait for you to be ready so if you intend to always be able to protect your family and yourself, you absolutely MUST learn how to comfortably carry your pistol.

Our holsters are designed with a very nice piece of leather to keep the gun off of your skin. The shape has been designed to allow a fast, confident grasp on the grip of the gun and wide tabs to help distribute the weight of your gun.

The plastic outer shell that won’t collapse so you can re-holster your weapon easily with one hand. You won’t find a more comfortable holster anywhere and that’s written right into our guarantee.

When we designed our holster, we didn’t stop at comfort and concealability. We made sure that it is also the most functional holster available. Most other hybrid holsters use rivets to attach the kydex directly to the leather. This is OK when your holster is new, but it can cause problems when your holster has had time to break in. What happens is that over time the leather begins to form to your body, but what you may not realize is that the leather also forms to your gun. On the back of the holster, the leather may bulge and create a pocket around the gun, which loosens the holster. If your holster has rivets, the only way you can tighten your holster is to either cinch in your belt or remold the plastic yourself.

Our holsters are designed better. We have an adjustable retention system, which allows you to tighten or loosen the holster as you see fit. So after your holster has been fully broken in, if it has loosened, all you have to do is tighten the screws that hold the kydex shell to the leather.

Our holsters are also adjustable for cant and ride height. If you want your holster to have a different angle, just raise or lower one of the clips. If you want your holster to ride higher or lower on your waist, all you have to do is raise or lower both clips in the same direction.

All of these features make our holster highly concealable, incredibly comfortable, and very functional. It’s very important that you choose a holster that has met this criteria, because you will be more likely to carry your weapon to protect your family and yourself from criminals who have no regard for human life.

Try our holster for a month. If you don’t agree it’s the most comfortable, concealable holster you’ve every worn, we’ll gladly buy it back with no questions asked. Our holsters also come with an unconditional and fully transferable 50 year warranty.

So check out our list of gun holsters from our website to find the holster for your gun and send us an email support@OldFaithfulHolsters.com if you have any questions.

Holster Kits overview

Posted by on Apr 15, 2012 in Videos | 2 comments

Tough Stuff

Posted by on Apr 14, 2012 in Blog, Videos | 0 comments

Horsehide vs Cowhide

Posted by on Apr 4, 2012 in Blog, Videos | 2 comments